Egyptian Amulet

" Egyptian Faience ":

The Eye of Horus

" Wedjat Eye "

 

Egyptian symbol of protection, royal power and good health.

 

Late Period

From the 26th Saite Dynasty ( 664 BC ) to the conquest of Alexander the Great, 332 BC.

 

** The Eye of Horus **

The Eye of Horus, wedjat eye or udjat eye is a concept and symbol in ancient Egyptian religion that represents well-being, healing, and protection. It derives from the mythical conflict between the god Horus with his rival Set, in which Set tore out or destroyed one or both of Horus's eyes and the eye was subsequently healed or returned to Horus with the assistance of another deity, such as Thoth. Horus subsequently offered the eye to his deceased father Osiris, and its revivifying power sustained Osiris in the afterlife. The Eye of Horus was thus equated with funerary offerings, as well as with all the offerings given to deities in temple ritual. It could also represent other concepts, such as the moon, whose waxing and waning was likened to the injury and restoration of the eye.

 

 

 

Egyptian Amulet - The Eye of Horus

SKU: Egyptian Amulet - $275
$275.00Price
  • Smoky Mountain Relic Room offers a 30 return policy with proof of purchase.

     

    -Limited Lifetime Authenticity Guarantee-

    The Smoky Mountain Relic Room stands behind the items we sell with a limited lifetime guarantee. We will exchange any item for store credit if the item sold is found by a certified authenticator not to be the authentic artifact, fossil, meteorite, or mineral that we advertised it as being. A letter, specific to the artifact, fossil, meteorite, or mineral in question, from a certified authenticator (in the business under the occupation-specific to the item in question), must be brought in with the item for the return to be acceptable. This guarantee is for the lifetime of the initial purchaser only. See the Relic Room Manager, downstairs inside Smoky Mountain Knife Works, for more information. Original receipt required for exchanges.

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