Meteorite Impact Glass

Australian Strwnfield Tektites

 

Formed from sand, earth, rock and other terrestrial debris that was liquified and ejected during a meteorite impact event, over 790,000 years ago in South East Asia. This is the youngest and largest Tektites Strewnfield in the world!

 

Each piece will be unique in size, shape, etc. Each will be of the same value and information. 

 

** Tektites **

Tektites are gravel-sized bodies composed of black, green, brown, or gray natural glass formed from terrestrial debris ejected during meteorite impacts. The term was coined by Austrian geologist Franz Eduard Suess (1867–1941), son of Eduard Suess. They generally range in size from millimeters to centimeters. Millimeter-scale tektites are known as microtektites.

Tektites are characterized by:

  • a fairly homogeneous composition
  • an extremely low content of water and other volatiles
  • an abundance of lechatelierite
  • a general lack of microscopic crystals known as microlites and chemical relation to the local bedrock or local sediments
  • their distribution within geographically extensive strewn fields

 

Although tektites are superficially similar to some terrestrial volcanic glasses (obsidians), they have unusual distinctive physical characteristics that distinguish them from such glasses. First, they are completely glassy and lack any microlites or phenocrysts, unlike terrestrial volcanic glasses. Second, although high in silica (>65 wt%), the bulk chemical and isotopic composition of tektites is closer to those of shales and similar sedimentary rocks and quite different from the bulk chemical and isotopic composition of terrestrial volcanic glasses. Third, tektites contain virtually no water (<0.02 wt%), unlike terrestrial volcanic glasses. Fourth, the flow-banding within tektites often contains particles and bands of lechatelierite, which are not found in terrestrial volcanic glasses. Finally, a few tektites contain partly melted inclusions of shocked and unshocked mineral grains, i.e. quartz, apatite, and zircon, as well as coesite.

The difference in water content can be used to distinguish tektites from terrestrial volcanic glasses. When heated to their melting point, terrestrial volcanic glasses turn into a foamy glass because of their content of water and other volatiles. Unlike terrestrial volcanic glass, a tektite produces only a few bubbles at most when heated to its melting point, because of its much lower water and other volatiles content.

 

 

Meteorite Impact Glass - Australian Strewnfield Tektites

SKU: Meteorite Tektites - $5
$5.00Price
  • Smoky Mountain Relic Room offers a 30 return policy with proof of purchase.

     

    -Limited Lifetime Authenticity Guarantee-

    The Smoky Mountain Relic Room stands behind the items we sell with a limnited lifetime guarantee. We will exchange any item for store credit if the item sold is found by a certified authenticator not to be the authentic artifact, fossil, meteorite or mineral that we advertised it as being. A letter, specific to the artifact, fossil, meteorite or mineral in question, from a certified authenticator (in the business under the occupation specific to the item in question) must be brought in with the item for the return to be acceptable. This guarantee is for the lifetime of the initial purchaser only. See the Relic Room Manager, downstairs inside Smoky Mountain Knife Works, for more information. Original receipt required for exchanges.